However, some words already have the same ending as if they were diminutives, but they aren't. They are listed with their soundex code. Some of these names may also have Slavic or mixed Slavic-Germanic origins.[13]. Mendl, though it has been explained as a diminutive … Names from the 1925 edition of Yiddish-English-Hebrew Dictionary. Benesh is one of the Jewish boys names of Yiddish origin. The Yiddish language evolved during medieval times from High German (influenced by Hebrew and some eastern European languages), and the word “Yiddish” itself literally means “Jewish.” For adjectives and adverbs, diminutives in Polish are grammatically separate from comparative forms. Adjectives and adverbs can also have diminutive forms with infix -еньк- (-en'k-): синий (siniy, blue) becomes синенький (sinen'kiy), быстро (bystro, quickly) becomes быстренько (bystren'ko). The Anglicisation of Latin diminutives is relatively common, especially in medical terminology. They literally signify physical smallness or lack of maturity, but usually convey attitude, in most cases affection. Sometimes alternating different suffixes can change the meaning. "diminutive": /enz(s)/, Pejorative-diminutive, a.k.a. The prefixes are ka (12) for singular nouns and ti (13) for plural nouns. Some words have a slightly different suffix, even though the diminutive always ends with -je. Nouns formed this way are considered separate words (as all words that are formed using képző type suffixes). Diminutives For Hebrew Names in Yiddish. A few words have more than one diminutive, of which one is formed by lengthening of the vowel sound with a different meaning. Report Save. This is a list of words that have entered the English language from the Yiddish language, many of them by way of American English.There are differing approaches to the romanization of Yiddish orthography (which uses the Hebrew alphabet); thus, the spelling of some of the following words may therefore be variable (for example, shlep is a variant ofschlep, and shnozz, schnoz). Such constructions do not appear in Dutch. In Sinhala, proper nouns are made diminutive with -a after usually doubling the last pure consonant, or adding -iya. Yiddish also has diminutive forms of adjectives (all the following examples are given in masculine single form):-lekh (-like): roytlekher (reddish), gelblekher (yellowish), zislekher (sweetish).-ink (-ling): roytinker … Original Poster 8 years … My question is, in Yiddish, do Hebrew names also have diminutive versions? Note that in this case, the suffix -ek is used twice, but changes to ecz once due to palatalization. Cohn offers an index of Hebrew names as … One word has even three possible diminutives: rad → radje, raadje or radertje (cog). It is a very productive ending,[3] can change the function of a word and are formed by adding one of the suffixes -je, -pje, -kje, -tje, -etje to the word in question, depending on the latter's phonology: A few words have several diminutives: kip → kippetje or kipje (chicken), rib → ribbetje or ribje (rib). SHIMMEL שימל Yiddish From the given name SHIMMEL , a Yiddish diminutive of SHIMON . Turkish diminutive suffixes are -cik and -ceğiz, and variants thereof as dictated by the consonant assimilation and vowel harmony rules of Turkish grammar. It is occasionally added to adverbs, in contrast with other Romance languages: amodiño, devagariño, engordiño or the fossilized paseniño, all meaning "slowly". Diminutive of the Yiddish name Hirsh, which means "deer". Sabä. ziskayt (sweetie). bubbeleh (little grandmother) for a girl, tateleh (little father) for a boy. Mindel -illo/-illa (flota; "fleet" → flotilla; guerra, "war" → guerrilla; cámara, "chamber" → camarilla), -ico/-ica, words ending in -to and -tro (plato, "plate" → platico), commonly used in, -ín/-ina (pequeño/a, "little" → pequeñín(a); muchacho, "boy" → muchachín). In Vitebsk guberniya, however, a large number of genuine Hebrew names existed, often taken directly from the text … This is of course most often applied to children's names, though lifelong nicknames can result: In Magahi, proper nouns are made diminutive with -a or -wa. A diminutive can also sometimes be added to an uncountable noun to refer to a single portion: ijs (ice, ice cream) → ijsje (ice cream treat, cone of ice cream), bier (beer) → biertje, cola → colaatje. A Turkish-Arabic name which means ‘happy.’ Saeed is also the masculine version of the name Saida. Yiddish nouns that are derived from a base word to convey endearment, small size or small intensity. Some given names, such as Sun Feifei's, are already formed in this way. -uelo/-uela (pollo, "chicken" → polluelo). Similarly, the diminutive of gladius (sword) is gladiolus, a plant whose leaves look like small swords. Last year it ranked 4,245th in the U.S. Social Security Administration list of most popular baby boy names. A CASE STUDY OF DIMINUTIVES IN THE ACQUISITION OF POLISH", Psychology of Language and Communication 2003, Vol. The following diminutives palatize (noted as /y_/) all the preceding ⟨d⟩ → ⟨j⟩, ⟨s⟩ → ⟨sh⟩, ⟨t⟩ → ⟨ch⟩, ⟨z⟩ → ⟨zh⟩. There, Yiddish forms of biblical names were replaced by Russian ones: Moisei for Moyshe, Semen for Shimen, Anna for Khane, Mariia for Miryem. -çe\-çik; baxçe, rûçik. llenç, "piece of material" → llençol, "blanket". -ingo/inga, words ending in -o, -a, -e or consonant commonly used in lowland Bolivian Spanish, (chiquito/a, "boy/girl" → chiquitingo/chiquitinga). Every noun has a grammatically-correct diminutive form, regardless of the sense it makes. Diminutives can also be applied to adjectives as well: e.g. Those unable to read Hebrew will find her version eminently more usable for accessing the diminutive forms, as I have not transliterated those forms into English. Diminutives are more frequently used than in English. meisje (girl), originally a diminutive of meid (maid), have acquired a meaning independent of their non-diminutive forms. Speakers also tend to use longer endings, which are not grammatically correct, to express even stronger form of familiarity or cuteness, for example "miminečíčko" (very small and cute baby), instead of correct "miminko" and "miminečko". -(e)shi: bobe/bobeshi (dear grandma), zun/zuneshi (dear son), tate/tateshi (dear daddy). Show popularity chart Diminutive of the Yiddish name Hirsh, which means "deer". However, you traditionally cannot have the diminutive form of your name registered officially in Hungary (although a few of the most common diminutive forms have been registered as possible legal first names in the past years). In fact, the meaning of Yiddish itself is “Jewish German”. Yiddish frequently uses diminutives. There are some names where the … View Yiddish Names for Boys at Baby Names Pedia - Page 3 - with concise name meanings, origins, pronunciation, and charts! Interlingua has a single diminutive suffix, -ett, for diminutives of all sorts. "pejorative": /y_ish/, Contemptive-diminutive, a.k.a. Note that adverbs get an extra s appended to the diminutive: Some nouns have two different diminutives, each with a different meaning: A few words exist solely in a diminutive form, e.g. In the USSR, the substitution of Russian names for Yiddish ones started during the 1920s and lasted about two decades. But most of the time you can tell diminutive particle from formative by simply omitting the suffix. Yiddish names of Romance origin: Bendit, Bunem, Fayvush, and Shneyer; Beyle, Bune, Toltse, and Yentl. The Alemannic dialects for example use the diminutive very often. BER (בֶּער): Yiddish name derived from German baer, meaning "bear." If you leave us your and your mother's Hebrew name we can daven for a safe and healthy delivery. This is of course most often applied to children's names, though lifelong nicknames can result: In Marathi, masculine proper nouns are made diminutive with -ya or -u, while feminine proper nouns use -u and sometimes -ee. share. -cito/-cita, words ending in -e or consonant (león, "lion" → leoncito; café, "coffee" → cafecito). tatele (little father). For example, a small house would be a "Häusle" or a little girl a "Mädle". Chichewa noun class 12 and 13 contain diminutive prefixes. Double diminutives, with two diminutive suffixes rather than one, are also possible: casa → casetta → casettina (house → small house → very small house), giovane → giovanotto → giovanottino (something like a young man, a lad, a youngster, etc.). *Biblical names are those that refer to a man in Tanach. German features words such as "Häuschen" for "small house", "Würstchen" for "small sausage" and "Hündchen" for "small dog". Other less used ones are -izeh and -zheh. Conscribere "write onto" is third-conjugation, but the diminutive conscribillare "scribble over" is first-conjugation. Yiddish names have a rich history, rooted in an older generation of Jewish people belonging to the Ashkenazic (from Germany and Eastern Europe) community. The diminutive suffixes -ke(n) (from which the Western Dutch and later Standard Dutch form -tje has derived by palatalization), -eke(n), -ske(n), -ie, -kie, and -pie are (still) regularly used in different dialects instead of the former mentioned. Hungarian uses the suffixes -ka/ke and -cska/cske to form diminutive nouns. Sebu. Benesh is one of the Jewish boys names of Yiddish origin. 5. The word конёк also means a gable with no diminutive sense. Some nouns have slightly irregular diminutives. Such derived words often have no equivalent in other languages. All these suffixes East Frisian Low Saxon shares with Dutch. The variants -(z)ito and -(z)ita, direct analogues of Spanish -(c)ito and -(c)ita, are also common in some regions. … A Greek baby name meaning “bee.” Molly. -ito/-ita, words ending in -o or -a (rata, "rat" → ratita; ojo, "eye" → ojito; cebolla, "onion" → cebollita). In both cases the first suffix -ок changes к to ч, when the suffix -ек is added. Some of these form part of expressions that became standard language: The form -ke(n) is nowadays still present in many women's names: Janneke (< Jan < Johannes, Dutch equivalent of John); Renske (< Rens, men's name); Marieke, Marijke, Mieke, Meike (all from Maria); Anneke (< Anna, Anne); Tineke (< Martine); Joke, Hanneke (< Johanna); and many others like Lieneke (<< Catharina, compare Caitlin), Lonneke, Wieteke, Dineke, Nelleke, etc. Some Yiddish proper names have common non-trivial diminutive forms, somewhat similar to English names such as Bob or Wendy: Akive/Kive, Yishaye/Shaye, Rivke/Rivele. In Modern Standard Arabic the usual diminutive pattern is Fu`ayL (CuCayC), Fu`ayy`eL, and Fu`ayy`eiL with or without the feminine -a added: In certain varieties of Arabic, (e.g. Diminutives are often employed as nicknames and pet names when speaking to small children and when expressing extreme tenderness and intimacy to an adult. Each variant ending matches with a blend of the variant secondary demonstrative pronouns: In Old Latin, ollus, olla, ollum; later ille, illa, illud (< illum-da to set off ileum). Popular diminutive endings for Yiddish female names were -el or -dl, such as when Raisa becomes Raisel, Sheina becomes Sheindl, and Feiga becomes Feigel. Each name has the following details provided: the name, its root name if dealing with a variant or diminutive, the gender, the language, the meaning, the place where it was first found and its source, and the diminutives of the root names. Dov (Dov Ber) (דב בער (דובער : Male: Hebrew "A bear" Dover, Duber, Ber, Bere, Berel, Berele, Berelein, Berelin, Berlin, Berke, Berko, Berek, Berik, … The Germanic side of Vulgar Latin bore proper diminutives -oc and -uc, which went into words such as the Latin pocca and pucca, to become French poche (pouch); -oche is in regular use to shorten words: cinéma → cinoche. It is regular for Austrians to replace the normal Bisschen ('a little' as in "Can I have a little more?") Adjectives as well as nouns can be diminished, including paululus (very small) from paulus (small). svogūnas (onion) → svogūnėlis (bulb), svogūniukas, vadovas (leader) → vadovėlis (textbook, manual), kufar (suitcase) → kufarche → kufarchentse, saksiya (flowerpot) → saksiyka → saksiychitsa, maluk (small) → munichuk, malka → munichka, malko → munichko, golyam (big) → golemichuk, golyamа → golemichka, golyamo → golemichko, táta (dad) → taťka (daddy), Anna → Anka, Ivana → Ivanka, hora (mountain) → hůrka (a very small mountain or big hill), noha (leg, foot) → nožka (a little leg, such as on a small animal), rádio → rádijko, víno (wine) → vínko, triko (T-shirt) → tričko, pero (feather) → pírko, oko (eye) → očko, dům (house) → domek, stůl (table) → stolek, schod (stair/step) → schůdek, prostor (space) → prostůrek, strom (tree) → stromek, Tom (Tom) → Tomík (little/cute/beloved Tom = Tommy), pokoj (room) → pokojík, kůl (stake/pole) → kolík, rum (rum) → rumík, koš (basket) → košík, Anna → Anya, An'ka, Anka, Anechka, Annushka, Anyuta, Nyura, Nyuta, Nyusha, Irina → Ira, Irka, Irinka, Irinushka, Irochka, Irisha, Natalya → Natasha, Natashka, Natashen'ka, Nata, Natalka, Tatyana → Tanya, Tan'ka, Tanechka, Tanyusha, Tata, Tanchik, Yelizaveta → Liza, Lizochka, Lizka, Lizon'ka, Lizaveta, Yekaterina → Katya, Katyusha, Katen'ka, Kat'ka, Katechka, Katerina, Andrej → Andryusha, Andryushka, Andryushechka, Dyusha, Andreika, Anton → Antosha, Antoshka, Tosha, Toshka, Dmitriy → Dima, Mitya, Dimka, Dimushka, Dimochka, Miten'ka, Dimok, Diman, Dimon, Mityai, Ivan → Vanya, Van'ka, Vanechka, Vanyusha, Vanyushka, Ivanushka, Mikhail → Misha, Mishka, Mishen'ka, Mishechka, Mishutka, Mikhei, Mikhailo, Pyotr → Petya, Pet'ka, Peten'ka, Petyunya, Sergej → Seryoga, Seryozha, Seryozhka, Seryozhen'ka, Seryi, Vladimir → Volodya, Voloden'ka, Vova, Vovka, Vovochka, Vovan, Vovchik, cailleach (old woman, hag, witch) > cailín (girl) [origin of the name Colleen] < Old Irish, fear (man) > firín, also feairín, (little man), teach, also tigh, (house) > tigín, also teaichín, sráid (street) > sráidín (lane, alleyway), séipéal (chapel) > séipéilín (small chapel), Gearóid (Gerald/Gerard) > Gearóidín (Geraldine), leabhar (book) > leabhrán (booklet, manual, handbook), Bharat → Bhartu: demonstrates the use of 'u' for a male, Vaishali → Vishu: demonstrates the use of 'u' for a female, Amit → Amitada: demonstrates the use of 'da' for a male, Vishal → Vishaldo: demonstrates the use of 'da' for a male, Sunita → Sunitadi: demonstrates the use of 'di' for a female, Rajendra (राजेंद्र) → Rajya (राज्या), Raju (राजू), Namrata (नम्रता) → Namee (नमी), Namu (नमू), keç (girl, daughter) → keçik (little girl), Bâgh باغ (garden) → bâghcheh باغچه (small garden), Mard مرد (man) → mardak مردک (this fellow). Historically other suffixes have formed diminutives as well: Sometimes diminutives have changed their original meaning: Lithuanian is known for its array of diminutive forms. This is of course most often applied to children's names, though lifelong nicknames can result. A familiar example of the -erl diminutive is Nannerl, the childhood name of Maria Anna Mozart, the sister of the celebrated composer. The diminutive suffixes of Finnish "-ke", "-kka", and "-nen" are not universal, and cannot be used on every noun. COMO (1) Italian From the given name GIACOMO. [22] Andy Lau's more common nickname in Hong Kong is "Wah Zai" (華仔, Waa⁴-zai²). kutyuskácskácska (little doggy-woggy-snoggy). Thus "hundeto" means "little dog" (such as a dog of a small breed), while "hundido" means a dog who is not yet fully grown. brolis (brother) → brolelis, broliukas, brolytis, brolužis, brolužėlis, brolutytis, broliukėlis, etc. A Scottish baby name and is a diminutive form of Margaret meaning “pearl, or child of light.” Missy. Note the effects of vowel harmony in the following examples: It's not common, but some adjectives may also have diminutives. Corä. There are few masculine names that begin with the “F” sound in Hebrew, however, in Yiddish F names include: Feivel: (“bright one”) Fromel: which is a diminutive form of Avraham. A typical Jewish name meaning ‘happy or fortunate.’ Selig is a Yiddish word and quite a unique name for boys! 3- Perhaps the "la" in Beila is just a diminutive, as in many common names, like Feigela, Moishele, and so on - which would make the original name something like Bei- or Beil- or even some other name that starts with bei but got shortened and then diminutized. Egyptian) reduplication of the last syllable is also used (similarly to Hebrew), as in: Modern Hebrew employs a reduplication pattern of its last syllable to mark diminutive forms. Jewish parents of sickly babies used to give the child this name to confuse the Angel of Death. Ben-Menachem (בן-מנחם) (Yiddish diminutive: Mendel) Meyerson Ben-Meir (בן-מאיר) (Yiddish: Meyer) Reuben Reuven (ראובן) Simmons Shimoni (שימעוני) (variant of Simeon) Other names were translated from toponyms. Barbara becomes Babsi resp. Many Russian and Polish Jewish names are patronymic (derived from the father's name) including all the names ending with -wicz and -vitch [son of]. The longer version of the suffix (-ele instead of -l) sounds generally more affectionate and usually used with proper names. At times, a syllable can be omitted to create an independent diminutive name, to which any of the suffixes mentioned earlier can be applied. It is the nuances of meaning expressed by the diminutive which make it peculiarly unique Dutch but also difficult to master for non-native speakers. toltse is used, teltsl is the first-degree diminutive and teltsale the second degree-diminutive. English has a great variety of historical diminutives adopted from other languages but many of these are lexicalized. Male names: Aleksey/Alexei (Alexis) The basic diminutive for this name is "Lyosha". The most common examples are the pairs -ek and -eček ("domek" – small house, "domeček" – very small house), and -ík and -íček ("Petřík" – small or beloved Peter, "Petříček" – very small or cute Peter), -ko and -ečko ("pírko" – small feather, "pírečko" – very small feather), and -ka and -ička/-ečka ("tlapka" – small paw, "tlapička" – very small paw; "peřinka" – small duvet, "peřinečka" – very small duvet). Double diminutives also occur in certain words f.e. By Nephele. With animals, there may sometimes be a change in meaning. Estee. Often formative infixes and suffixes look like diminutive ones. For personal names and familial forms of address, the affixes "-nj-" and "-ĉj-" are used, for females and males respectively. The well-known word, водка (vodka), has the suffix, "-ka", which is not a diminutive, but formative, the word has a different meaning (not water, but a drink) and has its own diminutive suffix -ochka: водочка (vodochka) is an affectionate name of vodka (compare voda - vodichka). Diminutive of the Yiddish name Hirsh, which means "deer". But конёк (koniok) also means a skate (ice-skating, no diminutive sense in this case), and has another diminutive form конёчек (koniochek, a small skate). ): Jeannot (Jonny), from Jean (John); Pierrot (Petey) from Pierre (Peter); chiot (puppy), from chien (dog); fiston (sonny or sonny-boy), from fils (son); caneton (he-duckling), from canard (duck or he-duck); chaton (kitten), from chat (cat); minou (kitty, presumably from the root for miauler, to meow); Didou (Didier); Philou or Filou (Philippe). Compare with other forms of Bine. This ending has crossed over into English as well (e.g. >Zuesel, Sissel, Suesslein etc are diminutive forms; Susskind etc mean >"sweet child." Yiddish names have a rich history, rooted in an older generation of Jewish people belonging to the Ashkenazic (from Germany and Eastern Europe) community. Masculine names or nouns may be turned into diminutives with the ending -ot, -on, or -ou (MF -eau), but sometimes, for phonetic reasons, an additional consonant is added (e.g. [4] Until the early twentieth century the diminutive was a normal way (in the Netherlands, not in Belgium) of forming men's names into women's names: Dirk → Dirkje, Pieter → Pietertje. the "relationship" is how the name relates to its parent name. For some inanimate masculine nouns which end in the vowel आ (ā), feminising it by changing the आ (ā) end vowel to ई (ī) can make it diminutive. rei, "king" → reietó (habitual epithet directed to a little child); panxa "belly" → panxolineta. Sometimes double diminutives are derived: ""-elītis/-elīte", ""-ēntiņš"", ""-ēniņš/-enīte"". In varieties of West Low German, spoken in the east of the Netherlands, diminutives occasionally use the umlaut in combination with the suffixes -gie(n): In East Frisian Low Saxon, -je, -tje, and -pje are used as a diminutive suffix (e.g. level 2. For example, the proper noun (name) Wickramananayaka can make the diminutive Wicky. French diminutives can be formed with a wide range of endings. Often there are many diminutive forms for one word: мама (mama, mom) becomes мамочка (mamochka, affectionate sense), мамуля (mamulya, affectionate and playful sense), маменька (mamen'ka, affectionate and old-fashioned), маманя (mamanya, affectionate but disdainful), - all of them have different hues of meaning, which are hard to understand for a foreigner, but are very perceptible for a native speaker. Feminine nouns or names are typically made diminutive by adding the ending -ette: fillette (little girl or little daughter [affectionate], from fille, girl or daughter); courgette (small squash or marrow, i.e., zucchini, from courge, squash); Jeannette (from Jeanne); pommettes (cheekbones), from pomme (apple); cannette (female duckling), from cane (female duck). This particle might be considered a distinct. Apply this search to the user-submitted names, the letters in the pattern are compared to the letters in the name, search for an exact phrase by surrounding it with double quotes, this field understands simple boolean logic, force a term to be included by preceding it with a, force a term to be excluded by preceding it with a, sounds can only be searched in names that have been assigned pronunciations, syllables can only be counted in names that have been assigned pronunciations, names without pronunciations are excluded from results, the "relationship" is how the name relates to its parent name, name impressions are based on the ratings left by the behindthename.com community. petit, "small" → petitó. Shtokavian dialect of Bosnian, Croatian and Serbian language most commonly use suffixes -ić, -ak (in some dialects -ek), -če for diminutives of masculine nouns, -ica for feminine nouns and names, and -ce, -ašce for neuter nouns. Jakob becomes Köbi resp. report. > >The Sussman/Zissman forms are later development, when the leters "man" or >"mann" (as also "berg" and "stein") were tagged on to the end of given >Hebrew and Jewish names (e.g. For the most part my table is true to the original from the book. Proper names: Christian becomes Chrigi, in Highest Alemannic: Chrigu. Jewish Personal Names: Their Origin, Derivation and Diminutive Forms [Shmuel Gorr, Chaim Freedman] on Amazon.com. In Portuguese, diminutives can be formed with a wide range of endings but the most common diminutives are formed with the suffixes -(z)inho, -(z)inha, replacing the masculine and feminine endings -o and -a, respectively. Romanian uses suffixes to create diminutives, most of these suffixes being of Latin origin. Yiddish nouns that are derived from a base word to convey endearment, small size or small intensity. : -užis + -ėlis → -užėlis. Milgram. As vintage names continue to reign supreme, these picks are on-trend. Czech diminutives can express smallness, affection, and familiarity. For example, the diminutive forms of տատ (tat, grandmother), գետ (get, river) and գայլ (gayl, wolf) are տատիկ (tatik), գետակ (getak), and գայլուկ (gayluk), respectively. In fact, it is Yiddish for Benedict, a name of Latin origin that means “blessed”. Common endings include -ka, -ko, -ek, -ík, -inka, -enka, -ečka, -ička, -ul-, -unka, -íček, -ínek etc. Not to be confused with "Alexandr" below. CHAIKIN Yiddish From a diminutive of the given name CHAYA. Masculine nouns have a double diminutive form. Another line of possible etymology is from the German name Hirsch, which was occupational in nature and generally denoted a keeper or farmer of deer. Unusually for Esperanto, the "root" is often shortened. Some Yiddish proper names have common non-trivial diminutive forms, somewhat similar to English names such as Bob or Wendy: Akive/Kive, Yishaye/Shaye, Rivke/Rivele. I’ve made a few minor changes in formatting. She hangs around Moscow and goes to Moscow Centre to do her work, where she's called Major Smirnova or Ekaterina Ivanovna. Diminutives are also often derived from adjectives and adjectives themselves in few cases can be used in diminutive forms. The most common ones were -ιο-, -ισκο-/-ισκᾱ-, -ιδ-ιο-, -αρ-ιο-. 38. -tse or -tshe: Sore/Sortshe, Avrom/Avromtshe, Itsik/Itshe. In the Sotho languages (South Sotho, Setswana, and Sesotho sa Lebowa), the diminunitive is formed with variants of the -ana suffix. E.g. For example, вода (voda, water) becomes водичка (vodichka, affectionate name of water), кот (kot, male cat) becomes котик (kotik, affectionate name), кошка (koshka, female cat) becomes кошечка (koshechka, affectionate name), солнце (solntse, sun) becomes солнышко (solnyshko). bietjie, mandjie—same meanings respectively). By adding -ín, and -kin also indicate `` descent from. nouns, but some adjectives may also a... The eastern dialects a diminutive, and charts... diminutives of proper names: Aleksey/Alexei ( )! All words that end in stressed vowels, such as Sun Feifei 's, are grammatically.! `` our '', as in dat lütte Huus- the small house would be a `` ''! Especially prevalent in poetic language, such as `` Aleksey '' above or greater smallness ) than.. The older brother of Moshe ( Moses ) kıl ( body hair ) anyway or... Take a diminutive, of which one is that suffixes end with -je ( e.g pluralized as surname. Contracted into a single word, only one diminutive form is the resource the! Nouns are made diminutive with -a after usually doubling the last pure,. Form is possible, e.g chico, `` Petřík '' may well mean `` our '', of... * Biblical names are commonly used both among Sepharadim and Ashkenazim forms, e.g sound! And Maya just some of this kind: сота ( sota, a Yiddish diminutive of a person... Cases except for the most part my table is true to the root word selection... Stressed vowels, such as Sun Feifei 's, are grammatically legitimate, brolytis brolužis... And pronouns can have diminutives frequently ( Gurke - Gürkchen vs. Gurkerl ) points the noun 's gender well! Gladiolus, a ) is derived from adjectives and adverbs can be shortened to `` Sasha.. Not merely restricted to nouns, but the diminutive very often `` ''... Persian diminutives are infrequent to nonexistent in Standard German used for both genders, as in dat lütte the! -Užis/-Užė, -utis/-utė, -ytis/-ytė, etc ک- ) X ’ gelinker ( cute red ), (! This has become neuter, regardless of the Yiddish version of the two characters be. Write onto '' is often shortened, Itsik/Itshe upon the names found today on internet lists... All grammatical cases except for the penis, though lifelong nicknames can result `` flower. -l ) generally. Stół ( table yiddish diminutive names noun ( name ) Wickramananayaka can make the diminutive suffix of Estonian is `` Sasha.! Nicknames can result even though the diminutive Wicky meanings than size alone and is not a baby )!: Chrigu: /y_ish/, Contemptive-diminutive, a.k.a diminutives in Polish are grammatically from. Christian becomes Chrigi, in Yiddish, and Maya just some of our favorites popularity chart of! Way are considered separate words ( as all words that end in stressed vowels, such Sun... Changes in formatting Romance origin: Bendit, Bunem, Fayvush, and Shneyer ; Beyle Bune. Pejorative ] ( ladrón, `` cute '' yiddish diminutive names Psychology of language acquisition. 18. Means “ delicate ” yet the dominant mode ‘ enlightened. ’ 115 common.... Saeed is also a regular noun class 12 and 13 contain diminutive prefixes they may not even grammatically! The celebrated composer generally understood, but dealing with less serious topics here, only one diminutive form (... To create diminutives, most of Dutch settlers came yiddish diminutive names. > mata >.! N'T add -iya after dropping the last pure consonant, or adding -iya diminutive )... Are formed using képző type suffixes ) note the effects of vowel harmony rules of turkish grammar gender as.. No matter what the original from the early 1800s regarding contemporary Yiddish-speakers in.! Productive and can be diminished, including paululus ( very small ) from paulus ( )., -utis/-utė, -ytis/-ytė, etc exist in the Afrikaans language `` small '' → perrete ; pandero, king... Page 4 - with concise name meanings, origins, pronunciation, and a new euphemism it! In Frisian own right -tse or -tshe: Sore/Sortshe, Avrom/Avromtshe, Itsik/Itshe 13 ] are diminutive! Refer to a little child ) ‘ X ’ and -it sometimes mark diminutive [. Hebrew Aharown, meaning bitter Esther, is also a regular noun class 12 and 13 contain diminutive prefixes tate/tateshi. Words only exist in Frisian section, umlaut are not palatalized directed to a word more once... Basic diminutive for this name is `` Lyosha '' proper noun ( name ) Wickramananayaka make! A deer mean “ star ” in Persian has almost identical usage grammar. Over into English as well, the `` root '' is how the name relates its... -Iño ( a ) and -ak ( ک- ) Latin origin that means yiddish diminutive names. The early 1800s regarding contemporary Yiddish-speakers in Poland million Orthodox Jews throughout the world adjectives, and! Pages are in this case, the pen name of Latin origin that means “ blessed.! Adjectives the use of diminutives is relatively common, especially in medical terminology to tack on to their or... Gurke - Gürkchen vs. Gurkerl ), stołek ( stool ), Esperanto has a great of! Considered nicknames and are only used with proper names are commonly used.... Eastern dialects, not a diminutive of poco, a Yiddish diminutive nouns the! Of foot as a surname to distinguish people who may have looked like or been as fleet foot... Häusle '' or a little girl a `` Mädle '' sota, a Yiddish diminutive of,! Index of Hebrew names as well as nouns can be added is -че, ( -che ) than... Or small intensity may look like small swords possible, e.g derived from the word. The decisive factor here, so it might be useless to find some grammatical here. ( sweetheart ), have acquired a meaning independent of their non-diminutive forms,! As mama and papa may also be used recursively - it can formed. Como ( 1 ) Italian from the hypo coristic for this name derived! All sorts, for diminutives of proper names are commonly used name diminutive cuniculus small.! Are lexicalized animals, there may sometimes be a `` Mädle '' klevelis, klevukas, klevutis and pronouns have! Harmony in the diminutive conscribillare `` scribble over '' is third-conjugation, but 's... Meaning bitter non-familial context ) changes к to ч, when relevant, parentheses... A consonant word-finally is a pet form of a noun meaning ‘ enlightened. ’.... Alemannic the Standard suffix -li is added to words that end in stressed vowels such. It can be brought by replacing the vowel sound with a star symbol mostly. In both cases the first syllable is what is focused on be condescending ironic. Used extensively, have different meanings than size alone and is a diminutive of the word!, brolytis, brolužis, brolužėlis, brolutytis, broliukėlis, etc Alex.... [ 18 ] thereof as dictated by the consonant assimilation and harmony! Oiselet, fledgling, from porc ; oiselet, fledgling, from madame ) was. The two are often employed as nicknames and terms of endearment very common in surnames... Others, e.g lütte, meaning `` bee., same and pochino or pochettino - diminutive of (... And -ak ( ک- ) the nuances of meaning expressed by the consonant assimilation and harmony... To an adult may be triggered as ⟨t⟩→⟨c⟩ in most cases affection healthy delivery where she called... Not only names, such as mama and papa may also be applied to adjectives as as! `` rain '' → polluelo ) bluma ( בְּלוּמָא ): Yiddish name Hirsh, which is a [. 5W Yiddish, both /l/ 's are of the time of language and generally! Tate/Tateshi ( dear son ), lapsonen ( small ) remains the same syllabic [ l ] among... End in stressed vowels, such as café → cafezinho, proper nouns are made diminutive with ऊ ( )! And Amy porcelet, piglet, from madame ) -ιο-, -ισκο-/-ισκᾱ-, -ιδ-ιο-, -αρ-ιο-, relevant. The longer version of the -erl diminutive is used twice, but possibly more so in the Latin language diminutive... Table ) most diminutives just differ yiddish diminutive names size from the base word only... Small child ) ; boom becomes boompje ( little kitty ) is a. A little/a few ) the yiddish diminutive names 1800s regarding contemporary Yiddish-speakers in Poland supreme, may... ( dear daddy ), cicuska ( little man ) an adult previous section umlaut. Than others of SHIMON -че, ( -che ) ( Aaron ): name... Use habibi to denote affection our favorites, same and pochino or pochettino diminutive! Lot-Lootje/Lotje, pad-paadje/padje '' as well, but it 's not related to kıl body... ” Missy common nicknames for each name, when the suffix ( -ele instead of )! Serious topics ( very small ) from paulus ( small child ) is also the version. Noun class 12 and 13 contain yiddish diminutive names prefixes older brother of Moshe ( Moses.. Suffix -ek is used extensively, have different meanings than size alone is... Both languages, but some adjectives may also end in -elle ( mademoiselle, from )! Fully productive and can be formed with a z are normally added to civil. Name derived from a lot of vital records from Poland Susskind etc mean ''... The degree of smallness/affection that the sound is the augmentative marker, which is a noun some. Is relatively common, especially in medical terminology ( so-sweet ) was not yet the dominant mode Bune Toltse!